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Callafornia Dreaming - Big Sur, CA by JaveFoto on Flickr.
Haughmond Abbey by Pommysheilah on Flickr.
Fuji san collection II by Jose Rentería Cobos on Flickr.
Drifter - Elidir Fawr - Explored by Nick Livesey Mountain Images on Flickr.
untitled by cherco on Flickr.

untitled by cherco on Flickr.

Mars on Earth - Alviso, CA by JaveFoto on Flickr.
The Moon’s North Pole by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr.Via Flickr:
NASA image release September 7, 2011
The Earth’s moon has been an endless source of fascination for humanity for thousands of years. When at last Apollo 11 landed on the moon’s surface in 1969, the crew found a desolate, lifeless orb, but one which still fascinates scientist and non-scientist alike.
This image of the moon’s north polar region was taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC. One of the primary scientific objectives of LROC is to identify regions of permanent shadow and near-permanent illumination. Since the start of the mission, LROC has acquired thousands of Wide Angle Camera images approaching the north pole. From these images, scientists produced this mosaic, which is composed of 983 images taken over a one month period during northern summer. This mosaic shows the pole when it is best illuminated, regions that are in shadow are candidates for permanent shadow. 
Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State UniversityNASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.Follow us on TwitterLike us on FacebookFind us on Instagram

The Moon’s North Pole by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
NASA image release September 7, 2011

The Earth’s moon has been an endless source of fascination for humanity for thousands of years. When at last Apollo 11 landed on the moon’s surface in 1969, the crew found a desolate, lifeless orb, but one which still fascinates scientist and non-scientist alike.

This image of the moon’s north polar region was taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC. One of the primary scientific objectives of LROC is to identify regions of permanent shadow and near-permanent illumination. Since the start of the mission, LROC has acquired thousands of Wide Angle Camera images approaching the north pole. From these images, scientists produced this mosaic, which is composed of 983 images taken over a one month period during northern summer. This mosaic shows the pole when it is best illuminated, regions that are in shadow are candidates for permanent shadow.

Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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(So That iPad Tablet Design Was Just Obvious, Eh?から)
the wall by raldenimassimo on Flickr.

the wall by raldenimassimo on Flickr.

If I was an alien, visiting Earth, I’d disguise myself as a cactus too. by c@rljones on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Another galactic image I took up in the volcanic crater at Mt Teide in Tenerife last week. This one’s another portrait stitch of about 5 images.
The milky way was a bit more prominent than the last image as I took it about 2 nights prior when the moon wasn’t quite as full so didn’t wash out the stars.
Please click on the image above to view it black (and larger), or click here to view large on black.This image was uploaded to my [landscapes] account, a selection of my [portrait + modelling] images can be found on my other profile here

If I was an alien, visiting Earth, I’d disguise myself as a cactus too. by c@rljones on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Another galactic image I took up in the volcanic crater at Mt Teide in Tenerife last week. This one’s another portrait stitch of about 5 images.

The milky way was a bit more prominent than the last image as I took it about 2 nights prior when the moon wasn’t quite as full so didn’t wash out the stars.

Please click on the image above to view it black (and larger), or click here to view large on black.

This image was uploaded to my [landscapes] account, a selection of my [portrait + modelling] images can be found on my other profile here